Preserve Your Branded Choice

Remember to indicate “DAW” (Dispense as Written) on each prescription, to preserve your branded choice

By indicating “DAW” (Dispense as Written) on your CellCept prescription or through your e-prescribing tool, your patient will get brand-name medicine at the pharmacy.

Each state has its own laws to govern generic substitution by a pharmacist. It is important to follow guidelines for the state in which the prescription is filled, which may not be the state in which the prescription is written.

If you use an e-prescribing tool:

  • Select brand-name CellCept from the medications list, and then take appropriate action in the e-prescribing system to avoid generic substitution
  • If brand-name CellCept is not an option in the medications list, consider contacting your local administrator to update the system to include CellCept

Your CellCept patients may be eligible for co-pay benefits

  • Patients eligible for the CellCept® Co-pay Card Program could:
    • Reduce their out-of-pocket costs to as little as $15 per monthly co-pay, regardless of their annual income level
    • Receive a maximum co-pay assistance of $10,000 per year
  • Remind your patients to take their CellCept® Co-pay Card to the pharmacy every time they fill a prescription for brand-name CellCept

Review the DAW laws in your state

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Alabama

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Alaska

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, “Brand Necessary.”

Arizona

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Arkansas

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, “Brand Necessary.”

California

Prescriber may indicate orally or in own handwriting “Do Not Substitute” or similar words. Allows use of a preprinted “Do Not Substitute” box, provided that the prescriber personally initials the box.

Colorado

Prescriber must handwrite “Dispense As Written” or hand-initial a preprinted box labeled “Dispense As Written.” May also be done electronically.

Connecticut

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “DAW” or “Dispense As Written.”

Prescriber indicates “Medically Necessary” in own handwriting.

Delaware

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “Brand Necessary” or “Brand Medically Necessary.”

District of Columbia

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Florida

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Georgia

Prescriber’s signature shall validate the prescriptions and, unless the prescriber handwrites “Brand Necessary” or “Brand Medically Necessary,” shall designate approval of drug substitution by the pharmacist.

Guam

A licensed practitioner shall prohibit drug product selection by handwriting the words “No Substitution” or the diminutive “No Sub” on the face of the prescription.

Hawaii

Prescriber must indicate “Brand Necessary” or “Brand Medically Necessary” in own handwriting or product selection is allowed.

Refer to the Department of Health, Food and Drug Branch.

Idaho

If a prescriber orders by any means that a brand-name drug must be dispensed, then no drug selection is permitted.

Illinois

Prescriber must indicate “May Not Substitute” by marking a designated box. See Section 225 ILCS 85/25.

Indiana

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Iowa

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Kansas

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Kentucky

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

"Brand Medically Necessary" to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed.

May indicate, in manner of his or her choice, on the prescription "Do Not Substitute," except that the indication shall not be preprinted on a prescription.

Louisiana

Box must be checked to prevent DPS.

Maine

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Box must be checked to prevent DPS.

Maryland

“Brand Medically Necessary” to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed.

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Massachusetts

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Must indicate "No Substitution."

Michigan

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “DAW” or “Dispense As Written.”

Minnesota

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “DAW” or “Dispense As Written,” unless the prescription is transmitted electronically in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 42, Section 423.

Mississippi

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Missouri

Prescriber's signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Montana

"Brand Name Medically Necessary" shall be handwritten (or printed if electronically generated) on the face of the prescription if it is medically necessary that an equivalent drug product not be selected.

Nebraska

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Nevada

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting "Dispense As Written."

New Hampshire

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

The prescribing practitioner handwrites "Medically Necessary" on each paper prescription, or uses electronic indications when transmitted electronically, or gives instructions when transmitted orally that the brand-name drug product is medically necessary.

New Jersey

Prescriber's signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

New Mexico

A licensed practitioner shall prohibit drug product selection by handwriting the words "No Substitution" or the diminutive "No Sub" on the face of the prescription.

New York

Prescriber must indicate "Dispense As Written" in the designated box, or positively indicate brand for electronic prescriptions.

"Brand Medically Necessary" to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed. An alternative provision that requires positive indication for electronic prescription

North Carolina

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

North Dakota

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, "Brand Medically Necessary."

Ohio

Prescriber must write in own handwriting "DAW" or "Dispense As Written."

Oklahoma

O.S. (1961) states that it is unlawful for a pharmacist to substitute without the authority of the prescriber or the purchaser.

Oregon

A practitioner may specify in writing, by a telephonic communication, or by electronic transmission that there shall be no substitution for the specified brand name drug in any prescription. May not use default values on the prescription. For an electronically transmitted prescription, the prescriber or prescriber's agent shall clearly indicate substitution instructions in the prescription drug order as well as all relevant electronic indicators sent as part of the electronic prescription transmission.

Pennsylvania

Prescriber’s signature shall validate the prescription and, unless the prescriber handwrites "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary," shall designate approval of drug substitution by the pharmacist.

Puerto Rico

Prescriber must write on the face of the prescription in own handwriting the phrase "Do Not Interchange."

Rhode Island

Prescriber’s signature shall validate the prescription and, unless the prescriber indicates "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary," shall designate approval of drug substitution by the pharmacist.

Patient may request, in writing, that the brand name be dispensed.

South Carolina

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

South Dakota

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, "Brand Necessary."

Tennessee

The prescriber shall, in the prescriber’s own handwriting, include on the prescription the following language (but not limited to): (1) "Brand Name Medically Necessary," "Dispense As Written," "Medically Necessary," "Brand Name," "No Generic"; or (2) Any abbreviation of the language in the section above; or (3) Any other prescriber handwritten notation, such as circling a preprinted "Dispense as Written" on the prescription order, that clearly conveys the intent that a brand name is necessary for the patient.

Texas

Prescriber must indicate "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary" in own handwriting or product selection is allowed.

Utah

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Allows use of preprinted "Do Not Substitute" checkbox.

Vermont

Prescriber must write "Brand Necessary," "No Substitution," "Dispense As Written," or "DAW" in own handwriting.

(See Sec 4.18 V.S.A. §4606 Brand Certification.)

Virginia

"Brand Medically Necessary" to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed. For all non-Medicaid patients, phrase must be included, but not required to be handwritten.

Washington

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

West Virginia

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber indicates "Medically Necessary" in own handwriting.

Prescriber must indicate "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary" in own handwriting or product selection is allowed.

Wisconsin

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Wyoming

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

*CellCept is used in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids.
According to your state’s DAW laws. Each state has specific guidelines on how to write a prescription to preserve your branded choice at the pharmacy.
By using the CellCept® Copay Card Program, the patient acknowledges and confirms that, at the time of usage, (s)he is currently eligible and meets the criteria set forth in the terms and conditions described.
This CellCept®  Co-pay Program is valid ONLY for patients with commercial (private or non-governmental) insurance who have a valid prescription for a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indication of a Genentech medication. Patients using Medicare, Medicaid, Medigap, Veteran’s Affairs (VA), Department of Defense (DoD), TRICARE or any other federal or state government program to pay for their medications are not eligible. The Program is not valid for medications that are eligible to be reimbursed in their entirety by private insurance plans or other programs.
Under the Program, the patient will pay a co-pay. After reaching the maximum Program benefit, the patient will be responsible for all Out-of-Pocket costs. This Program is not health insurance or a benefit plan. The Program does not obligate the use of any specific product or provider. Patients receiving assistance from charitable assistance programs (such as Genentech Patient Foundation) are not eligible. The Co-pay benefit cannot be combined with any other rebate, free trial, or similar offer for the medication. No party may seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received through this Program.
The Program may be accepted by participating pharmacies, physician offices, or hospitals. Once enrolled, this Program will not honor claims with date of service or medication dispensing that precede Program enrollment by more than 120 days. Use of this Program must be consistent with all relevant health insurance requirements. Participating patients, pharmacies, physician offices, and hospitals are responsible for reporting the receipt of all Program benefits as required by any insurer or by law. Program benefits may not be sold, purchased, traded, or offered for sale, purchase, or trade.
The patient or their guardian must be 18 years or older for the patient to be eligible. This Program is only valid in the United States and U.S. Territories. This Program is void where prohibited by law and shall follow state restrictions in relation to AB-rated generic equivalents (e.g. MA, CA) where applicable. Program eligibility is contingent upon the patient’s ability to meet and maintain all requirements set forth by the Program. Genentech reserves the right to rescind, revoke, or amend the Program without notice at any time.

Help your patients access brand-name medicine

Your commercially insured patients may pay as little as $15 per monthly co-pay with the CellCept® Co-pay Card Program.

Order co-pay cards for your practice

You can order printed CellCept® Co-pay Cards to give to your patients.